Kenyatta reportedly unhappy at constant snubs during UK visit

By Keith Somerville, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies

It seems that despite being invited to London to attend the recent international conference on Somalia and meetings with UK Prime Minister David Cameron, Uhuru Kenyatta seems to think that UK was snubbed in the UK.

The Star website in Kenya has written that,

“[Kenyatta’s] first visit to the UK as President, as his fan base fondly referred to it on social media, will not form the happiest chapter of his memoirs in the fullness of time. The tour was fraught with a bad press and subtle diplomatic snubs, not the least of which was the denial by Prime Minister David Cameron, his host, of a photo op. Throughout his three days in London, Monday May 6 to Wednesday 8, President Kenyatta and his entourage were constantly reminded of his status as an International Criminal Court indictee of crimes against humanity”.

But what did President Kenyatta expect?

Continue reading

Kenyatta’s ICC trial creates dilemma for the Commonwealth and Kenya’s aid donors and friends

By Keith Somerville, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies & Politics and International Relations Department, University of Kent

Kenya’s new president, Uhuru Kenyatta, has moved quickly to stress that he will govern on behalf of all Kenyans and that he and his government will try to adopt a new approach in which national resources will be used for development and service delivery rather than supporting a bloated government bureaucracy.  His first major move has been to cut the number of cabinet posts from a staggering 44 down to 18.  But as he settles in at State House he has something else on his mind, and something that worries other African governments, the Commonwealth and Kenya’s allies and aid donors in Britain, the United States and the European Union – his impending trial on charges of crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Hague.

Continue reading